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April 18, 2022 || Press Release

Broad Coalition of Civil Rights Groups, Faith Leaders, Business Advocates and Public Safety Organizations Join California’s Indian Tribes in Support of In-Person Tribal Sports Wagering Act and in Opposition to the Corporate Online Gambling Proposition

Leaders, Business Advocates and Public Safety Organizations Join California’s Indian Tribes in Support of In-Person Tribal Sports Wagering Act and in Opposition to the Corporate Online Gambling Proposition

For Immediate Release: April 18, 2022
Contact: Kathy Fairbanks, (916) 813-1010
kfairbanks@bcfpublicaffairs.com

Sacramento, CA – Today, the Coalition for Safe, Responsible Gaming announced that a broad coalition of California Indian tribes, civil rights organizations, homelessness advocates, faith leaders, public safety groups, and business advocates has come out in support of the in-person, Tribal Sports Wagering Act, which has qualified for the November 2022 California ballot, and in strong opposition to the Corporate Online Gambling Proposition.

“I’ve seen first-hand the transformative impacts tribal gaming has had on our people – providing funding for essential services like housing, healthcare, infrastructure and education,” said Chairman Anthony Roberts, Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation. “The in-person, Tribal Sports Wagering Act will allow Indian tribes to build on this legacy as the responsible stewards of gaming in California. On the other hand, the Corporate Online Gambling Proposition was written for the sole benefit of out-of-state online gambling corporations. We’re proud to join with so many respected organizations as we make our case to the voters.”

“Our support of the Tribal Sports Wagering Act is consistent with our long-standing support for disenfranchised communities to become self-sufficient,” said Rick L. Callender, President of the California Hawaii State Conference of the NAACP. “Accordingly, the CA/HI NAACP has grave concerns about the impacts that a massive expansion of online and mobile gambling would have on problem gambling in California—particularly among youth and communities of color.”

  • The Tribal Sports Wagering Act would allow California Indian tribes to offer in-person sports wagering at tribal casinos. This measure would uplift tribal and non-tribal communities alike – promoting Indian self-sufficiency and generating tens of millions of dollars each year in new tax revenues to support state priorities like public schools, emergency response and public safety.

  • The Corporate Online Gambling Proposition would legalize online and mobile sports gambling in California – turning virtually every cell phone, laptop, and tablet into a gambling device. This measure would expose California’s children and most vulnerable to online gambling, while jeopardizing Indian self-reliance. Proponents are deceptively promoting this measure as a “solution” to homelessness, but it’s simply bad public policy to fund homeless programs through a massive expansion of online gambling that is proven to cause more addiction, financial ruin and homelessness.

Paul Boden, Executive Director of the Western Region Advocacy Project, a statewide alliance committed to ending poverty and homelessness, said: “As we so clearly learned with the State Lottery and our public schools, it’s simply bad public policy to attempt to fund homelessness and mental health programs with promises of a small piece of the online gambling corporations’ profits. Unhoused Californians need help, but this is not the right way to do it. We’ve heard these empty promises before.”

The Coalition has launched a statewide TV and digital ad campaign to inform Californians of the flaws associated with the Corporate Online Gambling Proposition.

David Leonhardi, President of the Deputy Sheriff’s Association of San Diego County: “Online and mobile gambling are especially attractive to youth, and the Corporate Online Gambling Proposition lacks critical safeguards to prevent underage gambling, exposing our kids to increased risks of addiction and problem gambling.”

“This November ballot has the potential to greatly impact the progress California tribes have made toward self-sufficiency in the last two decades. Time and again, California voters have stood with Indian tribes to support gaming on tribal lands while rejecting initiatives that would hurt tribes,” said Vice-Chairwoman Beth Glasco, Barona Band of Mission Indians. “We’re confident that the voters will once again stand with us in allowing sports wagering on tribal lands, and against a massive expansion of online and mobile gambling promoted or controlled by out-of-state gambling corporations.”

Organizations Opposed to the Corporate Online Gambling Proposition:

Housing/ Homelessness Advocates

  • California Coalition for Rural Housing
  • Western Regional Advocacy Project

Social Justice and Faith-Based

  • California Hawaii State Conference NAACP
  • California League of United Latin American Citizens (CA LULAC)
  • La Raza Roundtable of California
  • AYPAL: Building API Community Power
  • Baptist Ministers Conference of Los Angeles and Southern California
  • Los Angeles Metro Churches
  • Los Angeles Urban League
  • National Action Network – Los Angeles
  • Racial Justice Allies of Sonoma County
  • Rural SURJ of Northern California
  • Santa Clarita Branch NAACP
  • Showing Up for Racial Justice – San Francisco
  • SURJ Sacramento
  • SURJ Santa Barbara
  • SURJ Santa Cruz County
  • SURJ North San Diego County
  • SURJ Marin
  • The Salvador E. Alvarez Institute for Non-Violence
  • Urban League of San Diego County

Political

  • Asian Americans for Good Government PAC

Business

  • California Asian Pacific Chamber of Commerce
  • California Black Chamber of Commerce
  • Sacramento Asian Chamber of Commerce
  • San Diego Regional East County Chamber of Commerce
  • Central California Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
  • El Dorado County Chamber of Commerce
  • Shingle Springs/Cameron Park Chamber of Commerce
  • La Mesa Chamber of Commerce
  • Lake Elsinore Valley Chamber of Commerce
  • Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce

Public Safety

  • Deputy Sheriff’s Association of San Diego County

California Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations

  • California Nations Indian Gaming Association (CNIGA)
  • Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations (TASIN)
  • Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians
  • Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians
  • Barona Band of Mission Indians
  • Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria
  • Bishop Paiute Tribe
  • Blue Lake Rancheria
  • Cabazon Band of Mission Indians
  • Cahto Tribe of the Laytonville Rancheria
  • Cahuilla Band of Indians
  • Chemehuevi Indian Tribe
  • Chicken Ranch Rancheria
  • Colusa Indian Community Council
  • Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians
  • Elk Valley Rancheria
  • Enterprise Rancheria
  • Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria
  • Greenville Rancheria
  • Ione Band of Miwok Indians
  • Mechoopda Indian Tribe of Chico Rancheria
  • Middletown Rancheria of Pomo Indians
  • Mooretown Rancheria
  • North Fork Rancheria
  • Pala Band of Mission Indians
  • Pechanga Band of Indians
  • Picayune Rancheria of Chukchansi Indians
  • Pit River Tribe
  • Redding Rancheria
  • San Pasqual Band of Mission Indians
  • Santa Rosa Band of Cahuilla Indians
  • Santa Rosa Rancheria Tachi-Yokut Tribe
  • Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians
  • Sherwood Valley Rancheria
  • Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians
  • Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians
  • Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation
  • Table Mountain Rancheria
  • Tejon Indian Tribe
  • Tolowa Dee-Ni’ Nation
  • Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians
  • Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians
  • Twenty-Nine Palms Band of Mission Indians
  • Tyme Maidu Tribe – Berry Creek Reservation
  • Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians
  • Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation

Organizations in Support of the Tribal Sports Wagering Act:

Homelessness Advocates

  • Western Regional Advocacy Project

Social Justice and Faith-Based

  • California Hawaii State Conference NAACP
  • AYPAL: Building API Community Power
  • Baptist Ministers Conference of Los Angeles and Southern California
  • La Raza Roundtable of California
  • Los Angeles Metro Churches
  • Los Angeles Urban League
  • National Action Network – Los Angeles
  • Racial Justice Allies of Sonoma County
  • Rural SURJ of Northern California
  • Santa Clarita Branch NAACP
  • Showing Up for Racial Justice – San Francisco
  • SURJ Sacramento
  • SURJ Santa Barbara
  • SURJ North San Diego County
  • Urban League of San Diego County

Political

  • California Young Democrats
  • Asian Americans for Good Government PAC
  • Solano County Board of Supervisors

Business

  • Central California Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
  • San Diego Regional East County Chamber of Commerce
  • El Dorado County Chamber of Commerce
  • La Mesa Chamber of Commerce
  • Shingle Springs/Cameron Park Chamber of Commerce
  • Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce

Public Safety

  • California District Attorneys Association
  • Deputy Sheriff’s Association of San Diego County
  • San Diego Police Officers Association

California Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations

  • California Nations Indian Gaming Association
  • Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians
  • Barona Band of Mission Indians
  • The Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria
  • Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians
  • Bishop Paiute Tribe
  • Chemehuevi Indian Tribe
  • Colusa Indian Community Council
  • Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians
  • Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria
  • Mechoopda Indian Tribe of Chico Rancheria
  • Middletown Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California
  • Morongo Band of Mission Indians
  • Pala Band of Mission Indians
  • Pechanga Band of Indians
  • San Pasqual Band of Mission Indians
  • Santa Rosa Rancheria Tachi-Yokut Tribe
  • Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians
  • Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians
  • Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians
  • Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation
  • Twenty-Nine Palms Band of Mission Indians
  • Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians
  • Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation

*Partial List